How to configure a Linux system to use NIS

You recently mounted an NFS share on your Linux system. When you go to the share directory and do the ‘ls -l‘ command, you notice that the user and group ID is showing instead of the name, so you don’t know who is owning what file or folder.

To fix this issue you must configure your Linux (Fedora in this example) system to use NIS.
Other *nix distributions should be configured in a similar method.

Edit /etc/yp.conf to only include:

domain example.com 
server nis9.eng.example.com
ypserver nis10.eng.example.com
ypserver nis4.eng.example.com

Edit /etc/sysconfig/network to include:

NISDOMAIN=example.com

Edit /etc/nsswitch.conf to say:

passwd: files nis
shadow: files nis
group:  files nis

Restart NIS:

service ypbind restart

To make sure that the NIS starts after a reboot, execute the following:

chkconfig --level 2345 ypbind on

You should now be able to log-in to your Linux box using your windows username and password.

NOTE:
There might be a 15 minute delay between the time password is changed in Windows, and the time it is propagated to the NIS server.